Report Cruelty | Tel: 1890 515 515 (Callers from outside of Republic of Ireland should use +353 43 33 25035) | Contact Us

News Sections

TV3’s ANIMAL A&E AND THE ISPCA EXPOSES HORROR OF PUPPY FARMING

The ISPCA and TV3’s Animal A&E are today highlighting the urgent need for the incoming Dog Breeding Establishment Bill by exposing deplorable conditions in one of the Country’s so called ‘puppy farms’ located in the Midlands. The dramatic story will be broadcast on TV3 News at 5:30 this evening. (Click Here to view the news item)

The discovery took place in County Tipperary, where TV3’s Andrea Hayes and the ISPCA’s Brendan Hughes discovered and seized numerous puppies from make-shift sheds at the back of a residential property.  Due to their cruel conditions and lack of human contact the creatures are scared and petrified upon rescue and most of the dogs are in need of urgent medical attention.

ISPCA Animal Welfare Inspectors found the abused dogs and puppies living in cramped, overcrowded and filthy kennels.  The ISPCA mounted a large-scale operation, which resulted in the safe rescue of 50 dogs and puppies.  The rescued dogs and puppies were voluntarily surrendered and are now at the ISPCA National Animal Centre undergoing treatment, assessment and recuperation.

Animal A&E Executive Producer, Andrew Byrne says:  “Ireland really is a nation of animal lovers and we are truly overwhelmed with the response from our viewers to the show.  With this in mind we are delighted that Animal A&E is returning to our screens this New Year.  Once again we will follow the highs and lows of some adorable and much loved pets at UCD, as well as the tireless work of the ISPCA out on the road.  The first episode of the new series will bring our viewers face to face with the bitter reality of the neglect and cruelty which is shown towards some animals in Ireland and is deeply moving and emotional to watch”.

ISPCA Chief Inspector Conor Dowling said: “The dogs in this establishment were living in extremely sub-standard conditions and not receiving the basic care or attention they needed and deserved. The dogs and kennels were filthy, wet and overcrowded”.

ISPCA Inspector Brendan Hughes added: “The smell in the shed was horrendous. The ammonia in the air made it difficult to breathe. In fact, my camera would not function due to the ammonia levels”.

The dogs rescued are of various breeds – Huskies, Bichon Frise, West Highland Terriers, Jack Russell Terriers, Shih tzus and Bichon and Jack Russells. They include pregnant bitches and puppies aged only a few days old. All are expected to make a full recovery over time and permanent new homes are being sought.

The ISPCA believes that rigorous enforcement of the new Dog Breeding Establishments Bill, which comes into force in January 2011, is essential if the cruel practice of puppy farming is to be stopped. Major rescue operations such as this places significant demands on the ISPCA, both financially and logistically involving dozens of personnel and extensive veterinary care.

This latest rescue operation will cost the charity thousands of euros which heaps further pressure on an organisation already struggling to raise funds in the current economic climate. 95% of our funding comes from voluntary fundraising and the ISPCA urgently needs the public’s help to deal with this large volume of dogs and puppies that require intensive care.

The ISPCA is urging the public to please donate now.  No amount is too small.   

The ISPCA believes that rigorous enforcement of the new Dog Breeding Establishments Bill, which comes into force in January 2011, is essential if the cruel practice of puppy farming is to be stopped.

Viewed 4830 times.

Share This Story